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weirdios:

Game: Blackbar

Blackbar is a dystopian short story disguised as a puzzle game. All letters between you and your sister are filtered by the censors of a dystopian government. The object of the game is to fill in the missing words in order to get the complete messages, but the gameplay is primarily a device to draw you into the story. It worked on me. My only complaint is the game was over too soon. I would love to see more games that tie storytelling with a simple and playful mechanic, like this.

Blackbar was written by Neven Mrgan, one of the authors of probably the first iOS indie game success story, The Incident, and also of the upcoming game Space Age (Trailer).

timelightbox:

Photograph by Andrew Milligan—PA Photos/Landov
Nov. 20, 2013. Karis, an 11-week-old lion cub plays in fallen leaves brushed up by keepers in her enclosure at Blair Drummond Safari Park, near Stirling, central Scotland.
From the 50th anniversary of Kennedy’s assassination and recovery efforts in the Philippines and Illinois to Batkid saving San Francisco and an 11-week-old lion cub playing in the fall foliage, TIME presents the best pictures of the week.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS-1D X
ISO
2000
Aperture
f/4
Exposure
1/800th
Focal Length
140mm

timelightbox:

Photograph by Andrew Milligan—PA Photos/Landov

Nov. 20, 2013. Karis, an 11-week-old lion cub plays in fallen leaves brushed up by keepers in her enclosure at Blair Drummond Safari Park, near Stirling, central Scotland.

From the 50th anniversary of Kennedy’s assassination and recovery efforts in the Philippines and Illinois to Batkid saving San Francisco and an 11-week-old lion cub playing in the fall foliage, TIME presents the best pictures of the week.

timelightbox:

Photograph by Air New Zealand/EPA

Dec. 2, 2013. A handout image released by Air New Zealand shows an Air New Zealand Boeing 777-300 aircraft with a graphic of of the mythical dragon Smaug, the star of the second installment of Sir Peter Jackson’s Hobbit movie trilogy in Auckland, New Zealand.

From tributes to the life of Nelson Mandela and violent protests in Ukraine and Thailand to chaos in the Central African Republic and a rare cloud inversion filling in the Grand Canyon, TIME presents the best picture of the week.

timelightbox:

Photograph by Allan Sekula (1951 - 2013)—Courtesy of the artist and Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica
Artist and critic Allan Sekula not only influenced how we understand photography, but redefined how the medium is discussed. Working between the worlds of conceptual and documentary photography and film, Sekula tackled issues of late contemporary capitalism and globalization, as in his projects Fish Story (above). 
In Memoriam: Remembering the Photographers We Lost in 2013 on LightBox.
Zoom Info
Camera
Epson PerfectionV700

timelightbox:

Photograph by Allan Sekula (1951 - 2013)—Courtesy of the artist and Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica

Artist and critic Allan Sekula not only influenced how we understand photography, but redefined how the medium is discussed. Working between the worlds of conceptual and documentary photography and film, Sekula tackled issues of late contemporary capitalism and globalization, as in his projects Fish Story (above).

In Memoriam: Remembering the Photographers We Lost in 2013 on LightBox.

timelightbox:

Photograph by John Tlumacki—The Boston Globe/Getty Images 
Boston, Mass., USA. April 15, 2013.

"The first bomb went off on the Boylston Street sidewalk less than 45 feet from me. The percussion from the blast jolted me. I saw runner Bill Iffrig from Lake Stevens, Wash., fall to the pavement. I ran forward to photograph him. Three Boston Police officers bolted towards him at the same time, one with her gun drawn, as the second bomb exploded three blocks away. I had not seen the officer’s gun until I edited the photos. I didn’t understand at first what had happened, thinking maybe it was a cannon salute or a manhole explosion. But when I ran to the sidewalk area several feet away, I saw the horror of what the bomb did. I then began to comprehend what I was photographing. I tried not to take my eye off the camera. Smoke was thick. A police officer looked me in the eyes and said, “You shouldn’t be here. Another bomb could go off.” Bodies were still smoldering, legs were blown off, and massive amounts of blood covered the sidewalk."

TIME Picks the Top 10 Photos of 2013
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS-1D X
ISO
200
Aperture
f/3.5
Exposure
1/2500th
Focal Length
24mm

timelightbox:

Photograph by John Tlumacki—The Boston Globe/Getty Images

Boston, Mass., USA. April 15, 2013.

"The first bomb went off on the Boylston Street sidewalk less than 45 feet from me. The percussion from the blast jolted me. I saw runner Bill Iffrig from Lake Stevens, Wash., fall to the pavement. I ran forward to photograph him. Three Boston Police officers bolted towards him at the same time, one with her gun drawn, as the second bomb exploded three blocks away. I had not seen the officer’s gun until I edited the photos. I didn’t understand at first what had happened, thinking maybe it was a cannon salute or a manhole explosion. But when I ran to the sidewalk area several feet away, I saw the horror of what the bomb did. I then began to comprehend what I was photographing. I tried not to take my eye off the camera. Smoke was thick. A police officer looked me in the eyes and said, “You shouldn’t be here. Another bomb could go off.” Bodies were still smoldering, legs were blown off, and massive amounts of blood covered the sidewalk."

TIME Picks the Top 10 Photos of 2013

timelightbox:

Photograph by Nan Goldin

SPACE is a group exhibition of ten leading contemporary photographers that reconsiders the impact of landscape photography at a time when we are increasingly divorced from the natural world. Photographers presented in SPACE are Lee Friedlander, John Divola, Nan Goldin, Jack Pierson, Juergen Teller, Catherine Opie, Todd Hido, Peter Sutherland, Mike Brodie and Jim Mangan

SPACE is located at 625 Main Street in Park City, Utah. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, January 16 from 6-8PM; an exhibition party will be held on the night of Saturday, January 18.

SPACE, a photo exhibition at Sundance Film Festival, is on view Jan. 16 - Feb. 15, 2014

timelightbox:

Photograph by Shannon Jensen—Getty Images

Shannon Jensen’s project, “A Long Walk,” saw her visit refugee camps in northeast South Sudan. Aiming to document the plight of refugees fleeing both the Blue Nile and South Kordofan, Jensen took an unusual tack: Instead of photographing the refugees themselves, she focused on their worn-out shoes, which she believes are visceral reminders of the struggle of displaced people. The images that emerge are as simple as they are haunting.
Pictured are the shoes of Musa Shep, a 2-year-old boy from the village of Gabanit, South Sudan, who traveled for more than 20 days to reach South Sudan’s northern border. He sat on the shoulders of his mother.

Read more on LightBox about the Open Society Foundation‘s annual Moving Walls exhibition which aims to support photographers working on social, political and human-rights issues that can sometimes fall under the radar.
Zoom Info
Camera
Nikon D800
ISO
400
Aperture
f/6.3
Exposure
1/320th
Focal Length
35mm

timelightbox:

Photograph by Shannon Jensen—Getty Images

Shannon Jensen’s project, “A Long Walk,” saw her visit refugee camps in northeast South Sudan. Aiming to document the plight of refugees fleeing both the Blue Nile and South Kordofan, Jensen took an unusual tack: Instead of photographing the refugees themselves, she focused on their worn-out shoes, which she believes are visceral reminders of the struggle of displaced people. The images that emerge are as simple as they are haunting.

Pictured are the shoes of Musa Shep, a 2-year-old boy from the village of Gabanit, South Sudan, who traveled for more than 20 days to reach South Sudan’s northern border. He sat on the shoulders of his mother.

Read more on LightBox about the Open Society Foundation‘s annual Moving Walls exhibition which aims to support photographers working on social, political and human-rights issues that can sometimes fall under the radar.

timelightbox:

Photo: Camilo José Vergara
For more than four decades, Camilo José Vergara has photographed the poorest and most segregated communities in urban America. Both a sociologist and a photographer, Vergara is probably best known for his photos of urban blight in 1970s New York. But  for over twenty five years he has also pointed his lens at Detroit, to document not just the city’s decline but the quiet resilience of its people and its urban landscape. 
See the story here
Zoom Info
Camera
Nikon D600
ISO
6400
Exposure
1/40th

timelightbox:

Photo: Camilo José Vergara

For more than four decades, Camilo José Vergara has photographed the poorest and most segregated communities in urban America. Both a sociologist and a photographer, Vergara is probably best known for his photos of urban blight in 1970s New York. But  for over twenty five years he has also pointed his lens at Detroit, to document not just the city’s decline but the quiet resilience of its people and its urban landscape. 

See the story here
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